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Biology - 9780176911140

Exploring the Diversity of Life
Brock Fenton, Denis Maxwell, Tom Haffie, Bill Milsom, Paul E. Hertz, Todd Nickle, Beverly McMillan, Peter Russell
Edition
5
Pub Date
2022-02-28
Copyright Year
2023
ISBN10
0176911146
ISBN13
9780176911140
Publisher
Nelson Cengage Adapted
Page Count
0
Binding Format
Hardbound Book
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Brock Fenton

M.B. (Brock) Fenton received his Ph.D. in 1969 for work in the ecology and behaviour of bats. Since then he has held academic positions at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada 1969 to 1986), York University (Toronto, Canada 1986 to 2003) and the University of Western Ontario (2003 to present). He has published over 200 papers in refereed journals (most of them about bats), as well as numerous nontechnical contributions. He has written three books about bats intended for a general audience (Just bats 1983, University of Toronto Press; Bats 1992 - revised edition 2001 Facts On File Inc; and The bat: wings in the night sky 1998, Key Porter Press). He has supervised the work of 46 M.Sc. Students and 22 Ph.D. students who have completed their degrees. He currently supervises 5 M.Sc. students and 2 Ph.D. students. He continues his research on the ecology and behaviour of bats, with special emphasis on echolocation. He currently is an Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Denis Maxwell

(Ph.D., University of Western Ontario) teaches in the Department of Biology at the University of Western Ontario. Following his doctorate, he was awarded a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada post-doctoral fellowship. He undertook post-doctoral training at the Department of Energy—Plant Research Laboratory at Michigan State University, where he studied the function of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase. His research program, which is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, is focused on understanding the role of the mitochondrion in intracellular stress sensing and signalling.

Tom Haffie

is a graduate of the University of Guelph and the University of Saskatchewan in the area of microbial genetics. Currently the Learning Development Coordinator for the Faculty of Science at the University of Western Ontario, Tom has devoted his 20-year career to teaching large biology classes in lecture, laboratory, and tutorial settings. He holds a UWO Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching, a UWO Fellowship in Teaching Innovation, a Province of Ontario Award for Leadership in Faculty Teaching (LIFT), and a national 3M Fellowship for Excellence in Teaching.

Bill Milsom

Bill Milsom (Ph.D., University of British Columbia) is currently the Head of the Department of Zoology at the University of British Columbia where he has taught a variety of courses, including first year biology, for over 30 years. His research interests include the evolutionary origins of respiratory processes and the adaptive changes in these processes that allow animals to exploit diverse environments. He examines respiratory and cardiovascular adaptations in vertebrate animals in rest, sleep, exercise, altitude, dormancy, hibernation, diving, etc. This contributes to our understanding of the mechanistic basis of biodiversity and the physiological costs of habitat selection. His research has been funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. He has received several academic awards and distinctions including the Fry Medal of the Canadian Society of Zoologists, the August Krogh Award of the American Physiological Society, and the Izaak Walton Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring. He has served as the President of the Canadian Society of Zoologists and as President of the International Congress of Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry.

Paul E. Hertz

Todd Nickle

Todd Nickle received his Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University in 1998, and has been teaching biology at Mount Royal University ever since. He advocates Active Learning: students come to class prepared to work with material rather than just hear about it. Student preparation involves reading the text and applying the concepts to online exercises, the results of which inform what the next lecture will be about. Class time focusses on exploring connections between concepts and ideas in biology and how they relate to other disciplines, which inspired him coauthor a handbook for first-year science students (Science3). His interest in promoting best teaching practices among educators had him confirm the Alberta Introductory Biology Association as an official Society of Alberta; Todd is currently President. His work put him in the first cohort of Full Professors at Mount Royal University in 2012, garnered the 2015 ACIFA Innovation in Teaching Award, and the Distinguished Faculty Award from MRU in 2016.

Beverly McMillan

Beverly McMillan has been a science writer for more than 30 years and holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. In addition to her work on this textbook, she has coauthored eleven editions of a human biology text and written or coauthored numerous trade books on scientific subjects and natural history. She has also worked extensively as a content developer and editorial manager in educational and commercial publishing, including co-publishing ventures with Yale University Press, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. National Park Service and other partners.

Peter Russell

Brock Fenton

M.B. (Brock) Fenton received his Ph.D. in 1969 for work in the ecology and behaviour of bats. Since then he has held academic positions at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada 1969 to 1986), York University (Toronto, Canada 1986 to 2003) and the University of Western Ontario (2003 to present). He has published over 200 papers in refereed journals (most of them about bats), as well as numerous nontechnical contributions. He has written three books about bats intended for a general audience (Just bats 1983, University of Toronto Press; Bats 1992 - revised edition 2001 Facts On File Inc; and The bat: wings in the night sky 1998, Key Porter Press). He has supervised the work of 46 M.Sc. Students and 22 Ph.D. students who have completed their degrees. He currently supervises 5 M.Sc. students and 2 Ph.D. students. He continues his research on the ecology and behaviour of bats, with special emphasis on echolocation. He currently is an Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Denis Maxwell

(Ph.D., University of Western Ontario) teaches in the Department of Biology at the University of Western Ontario. Following his doctorate, he was awarded a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada post-doctoral fellowship. He undertook post-doctoral training at the Department of Energy—Plant Research Laboratory at Michigan State University, where he studied the function of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase. His research program, which is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, is focused on understanding the role of the mitochondrion in intracellular stress sensing and signalling.

Tom Haffie

is a graduate of the University of Guelph and the University of Saskatchewan in the area of microbial genetics. Currently the Learning Development Coordinator for the Faculty of Science at the University of Western Ontario, Tom has devoted his 20-year career to teaching large biology classes in lecture, laboratory, and tutorial settings. He holds a UWO Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching, a UWO Fellowship in Teaching Innovation, a Province of Ontario Award for Leadership in Faculty Teaching (LIFT), and a national 3M Fellowship for Excellence in Teaching.

Bill Milsom

Bill Milsom (Ph.D., University of British Columbia) is currently the Head of the Department of Zoology at the University of British Columbia where he has taught a variety of courses, including first year biology, for over 30 years. His research interests include the evolutionary origins of respiratory processes and the adaptive changes in these processes that allow animals to exploit diverse environments. He examines respiratory and cardiovascular adaptations in vertebrate animals in rest, sleep, exercise, altitude, dormancy, hibernation, diving, etc. This contributes to our understanding of the mechanistic basis of biodiversity and the physiological costs of habitat selection. His research has been funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. He has received several academic awards and distinctions including the Fry Medal of the Canadian Society of Zoologists, the August Krogh Award of the American Physiological Society, and the Izaak Walton Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring. He has served as the President of the Canadian Society of Zoologists and as President of the International Congress of Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry.

Paul E. Hertz

Todd Nickle

Todd Nickle received his Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University in 1998, and has been teaching biology at Mount Royal University ever since. He advocates Active Learning: students come to class prepared to work with material rather than just hear about it. Student preparation involves reading the text and applying the concepts to online exercises, the results of which inform what the next lecture will be about. Class time focusses on exploring connections between concepts and ideas in biology and how they relate to other disciplines, which inspired him coauthor a handbook for first-year science students (Science3). His interest in promoting best teaching practices among educators had him confirm the Alberta Introductory Biology Association as an official Society of Alberta; Todd is currently President. His work put him in the first cohort of Full Professors at Mount Royal University in 2012, garnered the 2015 ACIFA Innovation in Teaching Award, and the Distinguished Faculty Award from MRU in 2016.

Beverly McMillan

Beverly McMillan has been a science writer for more than 30 years and holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. In addition to her work on this textbook, she has coauthored eleven editions of a human biology text and written or coauthored numerous trade books on scientific subjects and natural history. She has also worked extensively as a content developer and editorial manager in educational and commercial publishing, including co-publishing ventures with Yale University Press, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. National Park Service and other partners.

Peter Russell

Brock Fenton

M.B. (Brock) Fenton received his Ph.D. in 1969 for work in the ecology and behaviour of bats. Since then he has held academic positions at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada 1969 to 1986), York University (Toronto, Canada 1986 to 2003) and the University of Western Ontario (2003 to present). He has published over 200 papers in refereed journals (most of them about bats), as well as numerous nontechnical contributions. He has written three books about bats intended for a general audience (Just bats 1983, University of Toronto Press; Bats 1992 - revised edition 2001 Facts On File Inc; and The bat: wings in the night sky 1998, Key Porter Press). He has supervised the work of 46 M.Sc. Students and 22 Ph.D. students who have completed their degrees. He currently supervises 5 M.Sc. students and 2 Ph.D. students. He continues his research on the ecology and behaviour of bats, with special emphasis on echolocation. He currently is an Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Denis Maxwell

(Ph.D., University of Western Ontario) teaches in the Department of Biology at the University of Western Ontario. Following his doctorate, he was awarded a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada post-doctoral fellowship. He undertook post-doctoral training at the Department of Energy—Plant Research Laboratory at Michigan State University, where he studied the function of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase. His research program, which is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, is focused on understanding the role of the mitochondrion in intracellular stress sensing and signalling.

Tom Haffie

is a graduate of the University of Guelph and the University of Saskatchewan in the area of microbial genetics. Currently the Learning Development Coordinator for the Faculty of Science at the University of Western Ontario, Tom has devoted his 20-year career to teaching large biology classes in lecture, laboratory, and tutorial settings. He holds a UWO Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching, a UWO Fellowship in Teaching Innovation, a Province of Ontario Award for Leadership in Faculty Teaching (LIFT), and a national 3M Fellowship for Excellence in Teaching.

Bill Milsom

Bill Milsom (Ph.D., University of British Columbia) is currently the Head of the Department of Zoology at the University of British Columbia where he has taught a variety of courses, including first year biology, for over 30 years. His research interests include the evolutionary origins of respiratory processes and the adaptive changes in these processes that allow animals to exploit diverse environments. He examines respiratory and cardiovascular adaptations in vertebrate animals in rest, sleep, exercise, altitude, dormancy, hibernation, diving, etc. This contributes to our understanding of the mechanistic basis of biodiversity and the physiological costs of habitat selection. His research has been funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. He has received several academic awards and distinctions including the Fry Medal of the Canadian Society of Zoologists, the August Krogh Award of the American Physiological Society, and the Izaak Walton Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring. He has served as the President of the Canadian Society of Zoologists and as President of the International Congress of Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry.

Paul E. Hertz

Todd Nickle

Todd Nickle received his Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University in 1998, and has been teaching biology at Mount Royal University ever since. He advocates Active Learning: students come to class prepared to work with material rather than just hear about it. Student preparation involves reading the text and applying the concepts to online exercises, the results of which inform what the next lecture will be about. Class time focusses on exploring connections between concepts and ideas in biology and how they relate to other disciplines, which inspired him coauthor a handbook for first-year science students (Science3). His interest in promoting best teaching practices among educators had him confirm the Alberta Introductory Biology Association as an official Society of Alberta; Todd is currently President. His work put him in the first cohort of Full Professors at Mount Royal University in 2012, garnered the 2015 ACIFA Innovation in Teaching Award, and the Distinguished Faculty Award from MRU in 2016.

Beverly McMillan

Beverly McMillan has been a science writer for more than 30 years and holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. In addition to her work on this textbook, she has coauthored eleven editions of a human biology text and written or coauthored numerous trade books on scientific subjects and natural history. She has also worked extensively as a content developer and editorial manager in educational and commercial publishing, including co-publishing ventures with Yale University Press, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. National Park Service and other partners.

Peter Russell

Brock Fenton

M.B. (Brock) Fenton received his Ph.D. in 1969 for work in the ecology and behaviour of bats. Since then he has held academic positions at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada 1969 to 1986), York University (Toronto, Canada 1986 to 2003) and the University of Western Ontario (2003 to present). He has published over 200 papers in refereed journals (most of them about bats), as well as numerous nontechnical contributions. He has written three books about bats intended for a general audience (Just bats 1983, University of Toronto Press; Bats 1992 - revised edition 2001 Facts On File Inc; and The bat: wings in the night sky 1998, Key Porter Press). He has supervised the work of 46 M.Sc. Students and 22 Ph.D. students who have completed their degrees. He currently supervises 5 M.Sc. students and 2 Ph.D. students. He continues his research on the ecology and behaviour of bats, with special emphasis on echolocation. He currently is an Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Denis Maxwell

(Ph.D., University of Western Ontario) teaches in the Department of Biology at the University of Western Ontario. Following his doctorate, he was awarded a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada post-doctoral fellowship. He undertook post-doctoral training at the Department of Energy—Plant Research Laboratory at Michigan State University, where he studied the function of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase. His research program, which is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, is focused on understanding the role of the mitochondrion in intracellular stress sensing and signalling.

Tom Haffie

is a graduate of the University of Guelph and the University of Saskatchewan in the area of microbial genetics. Currently the Learning Development Coordinator for the Faculty of Science at the University of Western Ontario, Tom has devoted his 20-year career to teaching large biology classes in lecture, laboratory, and tutorial settings. He holds a UWO Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching, a UWO Fellowship in Teaching Innovation, a Province of Ontario Award for Leadership in Faculty Teaching (LIFT), and a national 3M Fellowship for Excellence in Teaching.

Bill Milsom

Bill Milsom (Ph.D., University of British Columbia) is currently the Head of the Department of Zoology at the University of British Columbia where he has taught a variety of courses, including first year biology, for over 30 years. His research interests include the evolutionary origins of respiratory processes and the adaptive changes in these processes that allow animals to exploit diverse environments. He examines respiratory and cardiovascular adaptations in vertebrate animals in rest, sleep, exercise, altitude, dormancy, hibernation, diving, etc. This contributes to our understanding of the mechanistic basis of biodiversity and the physiological costs of habitat selection. His research has been funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. He has received several academic awards and distinctions including the Fry Medal of the Canadian Society of Zoologists, the August Krogh Award of the American Physiological Society, and the Izaak Walton Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring. He has served as the President of the Canadian Society of Zoologists and as President of the International Congress of Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry.

Paul E. Hertz

Todd Nickle

Todd Nickle received his Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University in 1998, and has been teaching biology at Mount Royal University ever since. He advocates Active Learning: students come to class prepared to work with material rather than just hear about it. Student preparation involves reading the text and applying the concepts to online exercises, the results of which inform what the next lecture will be about. Class time focusses on exploring connections between concepts and ideas in biology and how they relate to other disciplines, which inspired him coauthor a handbook for first-year science students (Science3). His interest in promoting best teaching practices among educators had him confirm the Alberta Introductory Biology Association as an official Society of Alberta; Todd is currently President. His work put him in the first cohort of Full Professors at Mount Royal University in 2012, garnered the 2015 ACIFA Innovation in Teaching Award, and the Distinguished Faculty Award from MRU in 2016.

Beverly McMillan

Beverly McMillan has been a science writer for more than 30 years and holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. In addition to her work on this textbook, she has coauthored eleven editions of a human biology text and written or coauthored numerous trade books on scientific subjects and natural history. She has also worked extensively as a content developer and editorial manager in educational and commercial publishing, including co-publishing ventures with Yale University Press, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. National Park Service and other partners.

Peter Russell

  • Product Description
  • Brock Fenton

    M.B. (Brock) Fenton received his Ph.D. in 1969 for work in the ecology and behaviour of bats. Since then he has held academic positions at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada 1969 to 1986), York University (Toronto, Canada 1986 to 2003) and the University of Western Ontario (2003 to present). He has published over 200 papers in refereed journals (most of them about bats), as well as numerous nontechnical contributions. He has written three books about bats intended for a general audience (Just bats 1983, University of Toronto Press; Bats 1992 - revised edition 2001 Facts On File Inc; and The bat: wings in the night sky 1998, Key Porter Press). He has supervised the work of 46 M.Sc. Students and 22 Ph.D. students who have completed their degrees. He currently supervises 5 M.Sc. students and 2 Ph.D. students. He continues his research on the ecology and behaviour of bats, with special emphasis on echolocation. He currently is an Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

    Denis Maxwell

    (Ph.D., University of Western Ontario) teaches in the Department of Biology at the University of Western Ontario. Following his doctorate, he was awarded a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada post-doctoral fellowship. He undertook post-doctoral training at the Department of Energy—Plant Research Laboratory at Michigan State University, where he studied the function of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase. His research program, which is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, is focused on understanding the role of the mitochondrion in intracellular stress sensing and signalling.

    Tom Haffie

    is a graduate of the University of Guelph and the University of Saskatchewan in the area of microbial genetics. Currently the Learning Development Coordinator for the Faculty of Science at the University of Western Ontario, Tom has devoted his 20-year career to teaching large biology classes in lecture, laboratory, and tutorial settings. He holds a UWO Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching, a UWO Fellowship in Teaching Innovation, a Province of Ontario Award for Leadership in Faculty Teaching (LIFT), and a national 3M Fellowship for Excellence in Teaching.

    Bill Milsom

    Bill Milsom (Ph.D., University of British Columbia) is currently the Head of the Department of Zoology at the University of British Columbia where he has taught a variety of courses, including first year biology, for over 30 years. His research interests include the evolutionary origins of respiratory processes and the adaptive changes in these processes that allow animals to exploit diverse environments. He examines respiratory and cardiovascular adaptations in vertebrate animals in rest, sleep, exercise, altitude, dormancy, hibernation, diving, etc. This contributes to our understanding of the mechanistic basis of biodiversity and the physiological costs of habitat selection. His research has been funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. He has received several academic awards and distinctions including the Fry Medal of the Canadian Society of Zoologists, the August Krogh Award of the American Physiological Society, and the Izaak Walton Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring. He has served as the President of the Canadian Society of Zoologists and as President of the International Congress of Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry.

    Paul E. Hertz

    Todd Nickle

    Todd Nickle received his Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University in 1998, and has been teaching biology at Mount Royal University ever since. He advocates Active Learning: students come to class prepared to work with material rather than just hear about it. Student preparation involves reading the text and applying the concepts to online exercises, the results of which inform what the next lecture will be about. Class time focusses on exploring connections between concepts and ideas in biology and how they relate to other disciplines, which inspired him coauthor a handbook for first-year science students (Science3). His interest in promoting best teaching practices among educators had him confirm the Alberta Introductory Biology Association as an official Society of Alberta; Todd is currently President. His work put him in the first cohort of Full Professors at Mount Royal University in 2012, garnered the 2015 ACIFA Innovation in Teaching Award, and the Distinguished Faculty Award from MRU in 2016.

    Beverly McMillan

    Beverly McMillan has been a science writer for more than 30 years and holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. In addition to her work on this textbook, she has coauthored eleven editions of a human biology text and written or coauthored numerous trade books on scientific subjects and natural history. She has also worked extensively as a content developer and editorial manager in educational and commercial publishing, including co-publishing ventures with Yale University Press, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. National Park Service and other partners.

    Peter Russell

  • Features
  • Brock Fenton

    M.B. (Brock) Fenton received his Ph.D. in 1969 for work in the ecology and behaviour of bats. Since then he has held academic positions at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada 1969 to 1986), York University (Toronto, Canada 1986 to 2003) and the University of Western Ontario (2003 to present). He has published over 200 papers in refereed journals (most of them about bats), as well as numerous nontechnical contributions. He has written three books about bats intended for a general audience (Just bats 1983, University of Toronto Press; Bats 1992 - revised edition 2001 Facts On File Inc; and The bat: wings in the night sky 1998, Key Porter Press). He has supervised the work of 46 M.Sc. Students and 22 Ph.D. students who have completed their degrees. He currently supervises 5 M.Sc. students and 2 Ph.D. students. He continues his research on the ecology and behaviour of bats, with special emphasis on echolocation. He currently is an Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

    Denis Maxwell

    (Ph.D., University of Western Ontario) teaches in the Department of Biology at the University of Western Ontario. Following his doctorate, he was awarded a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada post-doctoral fellowship. He undertook post-doctoral training at the Department of Energy—Plant Research Laboratory at Michigan State University, where he studied the function of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase. His research program, which is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, is focused on understanding the role of the mitochondrion in intracellular stress sensing and signalling.

    Tom Haffie

    is a graduate of the University of Guelph and the University of Saskatchewan in the area of microbial genetics. Currently the Learning Development Coordinator for the Faculty of Science at the University of Western Ontario, Tom has devoted his 20-year career to teaching large biology classes in lecture, laboratory, and tutorial settings. He holds a UWO Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching, a UWO Fellowship in Teaching Innovation, a Province of Ontario Award for Leadership in Faculty Teaching (LIFT), and a national 3M Fellowship for Excellence in Teaching.

    Bill Milsom

    Bill Milsom (Ph.D., University of British Columbia) is currently the Head of the Department of Zoology at the University of British Columbia where he has taught a variety of courses, including first year biology, for over 30 years. His research interests include the evolutionary origins of respiratory processes and the adaptive changes in these processes that allow animals to exploit diverse environments. He examines respiratory and cardiovascular adaptations in vertebrate animals in rest, sleep, exercise, altitude, dormancy, hibernation, diving, etc. This contributes to our understanding of the mechanistic basis of biodiversity and the physiological costs of habitat selection. His research has been funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. He has received several academic awards and distinctions including the Fry Medal of the Canadian Society of Zoologists, the August Krogh Award of the American Physiological Society, and the Izaak Walton Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring. He has served as the President of the Canadian Society of Zoologists and as President of the International Congress of Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry.

    Paul E. Hertz

    Todd Nickle

    Todd Nickle received his Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University in 1998, and has been teaching biology at Mount Royal University ever since. He advocates Active Learning: students come to class prepared to work with material rather than just hear about it. Student preparation involves reading the text and applying the concepts to online exercises, the results of which inform what the next lecture will be about. Class time focusses on exploring connections between concepts and ideas in biology and how they relate to other disciplines, which inspired him coauthor a handbook for first-year science students (Science3). His interest in promoting best teaching practices among educators had him confirm the Alberta Introductory Biology Association as an official Society of Alberta; Todd is currently President. His work put him in the first cohort of Full Professors at Mount Royal University in 2012, garnered the 2015 ACIFA Innovation in Teaching Award, and the Distinguished Faculty Award from MRU in 2016.

    Beverly McMillan

    Beverly McMillan has been a science writer for more than 30 years and holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. In addition to her work on this textbook, she has coauthored eleven editions of a human biology text and written or coauthored numerous trade books on scientific subjects and natural history. She has also worked extensively as a content developer and editorial manager in educational and commercial publishing, including co-publishing ventures with Yale University Press, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. National Park Service and other partners.

    Peter Russell

  • About the Author
  • Brock Fenton

    M.B. (Brock) Fenton received his Ph.D. in 1969 for work in the ecology and behaviour of bats. Since then he has held academic positions at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada 1969 to 1986), York University (Toronto, Canada 1986 to 2003) and the University of Western Ontario (2003 to present). He has published over 200 papers in refereed journals (most of them about bats), as well as numerous nontechnical contributions. He has written three books about bats intended for a general audience (Just bats 1983, University of Toronto Press; Bats 1992 - revised edition 2001 Facts On File Inc; and The bat: wings in the night sky 1998, Key Porter Press). He has supervised the work of 46 M.Sc. Students and 22 Ph.D. students who have completed their degrees. He currently supervises 5 M.Sc. students and 2 Ph.D. students. He continues his research on the ecology and behaviour of bats, with special emphasis on echolocation. He currently is an Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

    Denis Maxwell

    (Ph.D., University of Western Ontario) teaches in the Department of Biology at the University of Western Ontario. Following his doctorate, he was awarded a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada post-doctoral fellowship. He undertook post-doctoral training at the Department of Energy—Plant Research Laboratory at Michigan State University, where he studied the function of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase. His research program, which is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, is focused on understanding the role of the mitochondrion in intracellular stress sensing and signalling.

    Tom Haffie

    is a graduate of the University of Guelph and the University of Saskatchewan in the area of microbial genetics. Currently the Learning Development Coordinator for the Faculty of Science at the University of Western Ontario, Tom has devoted his 20-year career to teaching large biology classes in lecture, laboratory, and tutorial settings. He holds a UWO Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching, a UWO Fellowship in Teaching Innovation, a Province of Ontario Award for Leadership in Faculty Teaching (LIFT), and a national 3M Fellowship for Excellence in Teaching.

    Bill Milsom

    Bill Milsom (Ph.D., University of British Columbia) is currently the Head of the Department of Zoology at the University of British Columbia where he has taught a variety of courses, including first year biology, for over 30 years. His research interests include the evolutionary origins of respiratory processes and the adaptive changes in these processes that allow animals to exploit diverse environments. He examines respiratory and cardiovascular adaptations in vertebrate animals in rest, sleep, exercise, altitude, dormancy, hibernation, diving, etc. This contributes to our understanding of the mechanistic basis of biodiversity and the physiological costs of habitat selection. His research has been funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. He has received several academic awards and distinctions including the Fry Medal of the Canadian Society of Zoologists, the August Krogh Award of the American Physiological Society, and the Izaak Walton Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring. He has served as the President of the Canadian Society of Zoologists and as President of the International Congress of Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry.

    Paul E. Hertz

    Todd Nickle

    Todd Nickle received his Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University in 1998, and has been teaching biology at Mount Royal University ever since. He advocates Active Learning: students come to class prepared to work with material rather than just hear about it. Student preparation involves reading the text and applying the concepts to online exercises, the results of which inform what the next lecture will be about. Class time focusses on exploring connections between concepts and ideas in biology and how they relate to other disciplines, which inspired him coauthor a handbook for first-year science students (Science3). His interest in promoting best teaching practices among educators had him confirm the Alberta Introductory Biology Association as an official Society of Alberta; Todd is currently President. His work put him in the first cohort of Full Professors at Mount Royal University in 2012, garnered the 2015 ACIFA Innovation in Teaching Award, and the Distinguished Faculty Award from MRU in 2016.

    Beverly McMillan

    Beverly McMillan has been a science writer for more than 30 years and holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. In addition to her work on this textbook, she has coauthored eleven editions of a human biology text and written or coauthored numerous trade books on scientific subjects and natural history. She has also worked extensively as a content developer and editorial manager in educational and commercial publishing, including co-publishing ventures with Yale University Press, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. National Park Service and other partners.

    Peter Russell

  • Table of Contents
  • Brock Fenton

    M.B. (Brock) Fenton received his Ph.D. in 1969 for work in the ecology and behaviour of bats. Since then he has held academic positions at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada 1969 to 1986), York University (Toronto, Canada 1986 to 2003) and the University of Western Ontario (2003 to present). He has published over 200 papers in refereed journals (most of them about bats), as well as numerous nontechnical contributions. He has written three books about bats intended for a general audience (Just bats 1983, University of Toronto Press; Bats 1992 - revised edition 2001 Facts On File Inc; and The bat: wings in the night sky 1998, Key Porter Press). He has supervised the work of 46 M.Sc. Students and 22 Ph.D. students who have completed their degrees. He currently supervises 5 M.Sc. students and 2 Ph.D. students. He continues his research on the ecology and behaviour of bats, with special emphasis on echolocation. He currently is an Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

    Denis Maxwell

    (Ph.D., University of Western Ontario) teaches in the Department of Biology at the University of Western Ontario. Following his doctorate, he was awarded a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada post-doctoral fellowship. He undertook post-doctoral training at the Department of Energy—Plant Research Laboratory at Michigan State University, where he studied the function of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase. His research program, which is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, is focused on understanding the role of the mitochondrion in intracellular stress sensing and signalling.

    Tom Haffie

    is a graduate of the University of Guelph and the University of Saskatchewan in the area of microbial genetics. Currently the Learning Development Coordinator for the Faculty of Science at the University of Western Ontario, Tom has devoted his 20-year career to teaching large biology classes in lecture, laboratory, and tutorial settings. He holds a UWO Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching, a UWO Fellowship in Teaching Innovation, a Province of Ontario Award for Leadership in Faculty Teaching (LIFT), and a national 3M Fellowship for Excellence in Teaching.

    Bill Milsom

    Bill Milsom (Ph.D., University of British Columbia) is currently the Head of the Department of Zoology at the University of British Columbia where he has taught a variety of courses, including first year biology, for over 30 years. His research interests include the evolutionary origins of respiratory processes and the adaptive changes in these processes that allow animals to exploit diverse environments. He examines respiratory and cardiovascular adaptations in vertebrate animals in rest, sleep, exercise, altitude, dormancy, hibernation, diving, etc. This contributes to our understanding of the mechanistic basis of biodiversity and the physiological costs of habitat selection. His research has been funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. He has received several academic awards and distinctions including the Fry Medal of the Canadian Society of Zoologists, the August Krogh Award of the American Physiological Society, and the Izaak Walton Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring. He has served as the President of the Canadian Society of Zoologists and as President of the International Congress of Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry.

    Paul E. Hertz

    Todd Nickle

    Todd Nickle received his Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University in 1998, and has been teaching biology at Mount Royal University ever since. He advocates Active Learning: students come to class prepared to work with material rather than just hear about it. Student preparation involves reading the text and applying the concepts to online exercises, the results of which inform what the next lecture will be about. Class time focusses on exploring connections between concepts and ideas in biology and how they relate to other disciplines, which inspired him coauthor a handbook for first-year science students (Science3). His interest in promoting best teaching practices among educators had him confirm the Alberta Introductory Biology Association as an official Society of Alberta; Todd is currently President. His work put him in the first cohort of Full Professors at Mount Royal University in 2012, garnered the 2015 ACIFA Innovation in Teaching Award, and the Distinguished Faculty Award from MRU in 2016.

    Beverly McMillan

    Beverly McMillan has been a science writer for more than 30 years and holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. In addition to her work on this textbook, she has coauthored eleven editions of a human biology text and written or coauthored numerous trade books on scientific subjects and natural history. She has also worked extensively as a content developer and editorial manager in educational and commercial publishing, including co-publishing ventures with Yale University Press, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. National Park Service and other partners.

    Peter Russell

 
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