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Media, Crime, and Criminal Justice

MEDIA CRIME & CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Media, Crime, and Criminal Justice
Edition
5
Pub Date
2014-04-22
Copyright Year
2015
ISBN10
1285459059
ISBN13
9781285459059
Publisher
Wadsworth Publishing
Page Count
0
Dimensions
6.38 in
9.13 in
0.56 in
Binding Format
Soft Cover
Units Per Carton
32.00
In Cart
$116.76
(Retail price: $145.95)
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Become a critical media consumer with the help of MEDIA, CRIME, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE. With the ever-increasing role of media in both reporting crime and shaping it into infotainment, the importance of the interplay between contemporary media and the criminal justice system is greater today than ever before. Author Ray Surette comprehensively surveys this interplay and showcases its impact, emphasizing that people use media-provided knowledge to construct a picture of the world and then act based on this constructed reality. He also provides a bridge between relevant mass media research findings and criminal justice practice, and corrects common misconceptions about the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
  • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
  • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • 1. Crime, Justice, and Media.
  • 2. New Media and Social Constructionism.
  • 3. Images of Crime and Criminality.
  • 4. Criminogenic Media.
  • 5. Crime Fighters.
  • 6. The Courts.
  • 7. Corrections.
  • 8. Crime Control.
  • 9. The Media and Criminal Justice Policy.
  • 10. New Media, Crime, and Justice.
  • 11. New Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century.
Become a critical media consumer with the help of MEDIA, CRIME, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE. With the ever-increasing role of media in both reporting crime and shaping it into infotainment, the importance of the interplay between contemporary media and the criminal justice system is greater today than ever before. Author Ray Surette comprehensively surveys this interplay and showcases its impact, emphasizing that people use media-provided knowledge to construct a picture of the world and then act based on this constructed reality. He also provides a bridge between relevant mass media research findings and criminal justice practice, and corrects common misconceptions about the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
  • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
  • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • 1. Crime, Justice, and Media.
  • 2. New Media and Social Constructionism.
  • 3. Images of Crime and Criminality.
  • 4. Criminogenic Media.
  • 5. Crime Fighters.
  • 6. The Courts.
  • 7. Corrections.
  • 8. Crime Control.
  • 9. The Media and Criminal Justice Policy.
  • 10. New Media, Crime, and Justice.
  • 11. New Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century.
Become a critical media consumer with the help of MEDIA, CRIME, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE. With the ever-increasing role of media in both reporting crime and shaping it into infotainment, the importance of the interplay between contemporary media and the criminal justice system is greater today than ever before. Author Ray Surette comprehensively surveys this interplay and showcases its impact, emphasizing that people use media-provided knowledge to construct a picture of the world and then act based on this constructed reality. He also provides a bridge between relevant mass media research findings and criminal justice practice, and corrects common misconceptions about the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
  • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
  • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • 1. Crime, Justice, and Media.
  • 2. New Media and Social Constructionism.
  • 3. Images of Crime and Criminality.
  • 4. Criminogenic Media.
  • 5. Crime Fighters.
  • 6. The Courts.
  • 7. Corrections.
  • 8. Crime Control.
  • 9. The Media and Criminal Justice Policy.
  • 10. New Media, Crime, and Justice.
  • 11. New Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century.
Become a critical media consumer with the help of MEDIA, CRIME, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE. With the ever-increasing role of media in both reporting crime and shaping it into infotainment, the importance of the interplay between contemporary media and the criminal justice system is greater today than ever before. Author Ray Surette comprehensively surveys this interplay and showcases its impact, emphasizing that people use media-provided knowledge to construct a picture of the world and then act based on this constructed reality. He also provides a bridge between relevant mass media research findings and criminal justice practice, and corrects common misconceptions about the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
  • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
  • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
  • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
  • 1. Crime, Justice, and Media.
  • 2. New Media and Social Constructionism.
  • 3. Images of Crime and Criminality.
  • 4. Criminogenic Media.
  • 5. Crime Fighters.
  • 6. The Courts.
  • 7. Corrections.
  • 8. Crime Control.
  • 9. The Media and Criminal Justice Policy.
  • 10. New Media, Crime, and Justice.
  • 11. New Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century.
  • Product Description
  • Become a critical media consumer with the help of MEDIA, CRIME, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE. With the ever-increasing role of media in both reporting crime and shaping it into infotainment, the importance of the interplay between contemporary media and the criminal justice system is greater today than ever before. Author Ray Surette comprehensively surveys this interplay and showcases its impact, emphasizing that people use media-provided knowledge to construct a picture of the world and then act based on this constructed reality. He also provides a bridge between relevant mass media research findings and criminal justice practice, and corrects common misconceptions about the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
    • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
    • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • 1. Crime, Justice, and Media.
    • 2. New Media and Social Constructionism.
    • 3. Images of Crime and Criminality.
    • 4. Criminogenic Media.
    • 5. Crime Fighters.
    • 6. The Courts.
    • 7. Corrections.
    • 8. Crime Control.
    • 9. The Media and Criminal Justice Policy.
    • 10. New Media, Crime, and Justice.
    • 11. New Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century.
  • Features
  • Become a critical media consumer with the help of MEDIA, CRIME, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE. With the ever-increasing role of media in both reporting crime and shaping it into infotainment, the importance of the interplay between contemporary media and the criminal justice system is greater today than ever before. Author Ray Surette comprehensively surveys this interplay and showcases its impact, emphasizing that people use media-provided knowledge to construct a picture of the world and then act based on this constructed reality. He also provides a bridge between relevant mass media research findings and criminal justice practice, and corrects common misconceptions about the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
    • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
    • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • 1. Crime, Justice, and Media.
    • 2. New Media and Social Constructionism.
    • 3. Images of Crime and Criminality.
    • 4. Criminogenic Media.
    • 5. Crime Fighters.
    • 6. The Courts.
    • 7. Corrections.
    • 8. Crime Control.
    • 9. The Media and Criminal Justice Policy.
    • 10. New Media, Crime, and Justice.
    • 11. New Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century.
  • About the Author
  • Become a critical media consumer with the help of MEDIA, CRIME, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE. With the ever-increasing role of media in both reporting crime and shaping it into infotainment, the importance of the interplay between contemporary media and the criminal justice system is greater today than ever before. Author Ray Surette comprehensively surveys this interplay and showcases its impact, emphasizing that people use media-provided knowledge to construct a picture of the world and then act based on this constructed reality. He also provides a bridge between relevant mass media research findings and criminal justice practice, and corrects common misconceptions about the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
    • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
    • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • 1. Crime, Justice, and Media.
    • 2. New Media and Social Constructionism.
    • 3. Images of Crime and Criminality.
    • 4. Criminogenic Media.
    • 5. Crime Fighters.
    • 6. The Courts.
    • 7. Corrections.
    • 8. Crime Control.
    • 9. The Media and Criminal Justice Policy.
    • 10. New Media, Crime, and Justice.
    • 11. New Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century.
  • Table of Contents
  • Become a critical media consumer with the help of MEDIA, CRIME, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE. With the ever-increasing role of media in both reporting crime and shaping it into infotainment, the importance of the interplay between contemporary media and the criminal justice system is greater today than ever before. Author Ray Surette comprehensively surveys this interplay and showcases its impact, emphasizing that people use media-provided knowledge to construct a picture of the world and then act based on this constructed reality. He also provides a bridge between relevant mass media research findings and criminal justice practice, and corrects common misconceptions about the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • Newly organized into eleven chapters, the book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g., Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
    • A new Chapter 4, "Criminogenic Media," is dedicated to how the media portraits described in the book can be criminogenic and related to real-world criminal behavior. The ongoing debates regarding the effects of video games on player aggression and the impact of the Internet and social media on criminality are reviewed. The chapter also discusses copycat crime and media-orientated terrorism in detail.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
    • Chapter 11, "Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century," wraps up the main points of the book and offers projections about the future of the relationship between media, crime, and justice. It includes new discussions on competing models of the media's relationship to criminal justice and the evolving mediated crime-and-justice reality that reflects new and social media.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help students make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The book helps students become critical media consumers by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • The book follows the content and influence of the media as it relates to the committing of crime, as well as to the sequential components of the criminal justice system as typically covered in undergraduate criminal justice courses.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • Many recent examples illustrate the book's themes, and material covering new media and social media as they relate to crime is emphasized. Entire sections cover new topics such as the production of crime news; the dynamics of performance crime; the effect of video games; celebrity crime news; terrorism and the media; the impact of social media, self-surveillance, and memorial criminal justice policies; and mediated criminal justice. Other new topics include how white-collar crime is portrayed in the media (e.g. Bernie Madoff) and an expanded discussion of the CSI effect.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • The author discusses recent media crime and justice events and associated personalities, including Amanda Knox's Italian murder trial, the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting, the Jodi Arias murder trial, the Boston marathon bombings, "happy slapping, "ghost riding," and copycat crime. There are also new boxes on WikiLeaks, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • A new Chapter 10, "New Media, Crime, and Justice," discusses such topics as cybercrime, the dark web, how new media provide the means to commit new types of crimes (based on a discussion of a New York cannibal police officer), and the growth of performance crime (highlighting Smack Cams). Additional boxes discuss how social media have been used to further victimize crime victims as well as help law enforcement solve crimes by utilizing iPhones, Facebook, and YouTube.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • Numerous visuals and contemporary examples throughout the text help you make connections to the substantive points found in each chapter.
    • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The book helps you become a critical media consumer by highlighting and correcting common misconceptions regarding the mass media's effects on crime and justice.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • The author provides a scientific yet approachable treatment of the subject, with a well-researched and thorough review of the relevant empirical and legal data on the criminal justice system, the media's influence on attitudes, the media's impact on crime, and media-designed programs to reduce crime.
    • 1. Crime, Justice, and Media.
    • 2. New Media and Social Constructionism.
    • 3. Images of Crime and Criminality.
    • 4. Criminogenic Media.
    • 5. Crime Fighters.
    • 6. The Courts.
    • 7. Corrections.
    • 8. Crime Control.
    • 9. The Media and Criminal Justice Policy.
    • 10. New Media, Crime, and Justice.
    • 11. New Media, Crime, and Justice in the Twenty-First Century.
 
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