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Statistics

STATISTICS: A TOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH 4CE

A Tool for Social Research
Statistics
Edition
4
Pub Date
2018-05-28
Copyright Year
2019
ISBN10
0176725083
ISBN13
9780176725082
Publisher
Nelson Cengage Adapted
Page Count
0
Dimensions
8.00 in
10.00 in
0.88 in
Binding Format
Soft Cover
Units Per Carton
18.00
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Statistics: A Tool for Social Research, Fourth Canadian Edition, helps to construct and develop the skills necessary for social science majors to become statistically literate?computational competence, appreciation of statistics, and the ability to read professional social science literature?from a uniquely Canadian perspective. To do so, the text provides a comprehensive, yet exceptionally accessible and reader-friendly discussion of statistics that is appropriate for students with varying levels of mathematical skill, ranging from those who battle statistical ?anxiety? to those adept at math. The text provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of statistics in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step process, and equally stresses hand-based calculation and interpretation of statistics. Students learn to use and interpret statistics in a variety of settings, with most examples, demonstrations, and applications of statistics intended for a diversity of Canadian social issues and social science disciplines, including sociology, political science, social work, public administration, criminology and criminal justice, and gerontology. By providing a solid grounding in both traditional formulas and the use of the latest SPSS statistical software package, Healey and Prus help students to master key statistical concepts and hone the skills they will need to succeed as professionals in a social science field--or simply to become "statistically literate," intelligent consumers of social research.
  • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
  • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
  • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
  • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
  • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
  • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
  • Preface
  • Prologue: Basic Mathematics Review
  • Chapter 1: Introduction
  • Part One: Descriptive Statistics
  • Chapter 2: Basic Descriptive Statistics: Percentages, Ratios and Rates, Tables, Charts, and Graphs
  • Chapter 3: Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion
  • Chapter 4: The Normal Curve
  • Part Two: From Description to Inference
  • Chapter 5: Introduction to Inferential Statistics: Sampling and the Sampling Distribution
  • Chapter 6: Estimation Procedures for Sample Means and Proportions
  • Part Three: Bivariate Relationships: Tests of Significance and Measures of Association
  • Chapter 7: Hypothesis Testing with Nominal and Ordinal Variables: Chi Square
  • Chapter 8: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Nominal Level
  • Chapter 9: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Ordinal Level
  • Chapter 10: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The One-Sample Case
  • Chapter 11: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The Two-Sample Case
  • Chapter 12: Hypothesis Testing with More Than Two Means: One-Way Analysis of Variance
  • Chapter 13: Hypothesis Testing and Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Interval-Ratio Level
  • Part Four: Multivariate Techniques
  • Chapter 14: Partial Correlation and Multiple Regression and Correlation
  • Appendix A: Area Under the Normal Curve
  • Appendix B: Distribution of t
  • Appendix C: Distribution of Chi Square
  • Appendix D: Distribution of F
  • Appendix E: Using Statistics: Ideas for Research Projects
  • Appendix F: An Introduction to IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows
  • Appendix G: Information and Code Books for the 2012 Canadian
  • Community Health Survey and 2013 General Social Survey
  • Answers to Odd-Numbered Computational Problems
  • Glossary
  • Index
Statistics: A Tool for Social Research, Fourth Canadian Edition, helps to construct and develop the skills necessary for social science majors to become statistically literate?computational competence, appreciation of statistics, and the ability to read professional social science literature?from a uniquely Canadian perspective. To do so, the text provides a comprehensive, yet exceptionally accessible and reader-friendly discussion of statistics that is appropriate for students with varying levels of mathematical skill, ranging from those who battle statistical ?anxiety? to those adept at math. The text provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of statistics in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step process, and equally stresses hand-based calculation and interpretation of statistics. Students learn to use and interpret statistics in a variety of settings, with most examples, demonstrations, and applications of statistics intended for a diversity of Canadian social issues and social science disciplines, including sociology, political science, social work, public administration, criminology and criminal justice, and gerontology. By providing a solid grounding in both traditional formulas and the use of the latest SPSS statistical software package, Healey and Prus help students to master key statistical concepts and hone the skills they will need to succeed as professionals in a social science field--or simply to become "statistically literate," intelligent consumers of social research.
  • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
  • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
  • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
  • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
  • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
  • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
  • Preface
  • Prologue: Basic Mathematics Review
  • Chapter 1: Introduction
  • Part One: Descriptive Statistics
  • Chapter 2: Basic Descriptive Statistics: Percentages, Ratios and Rates, Tables, Charts, and Graphs
  • Chapter 3: Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion
  • Chapter 4: The Normal Curve
  • Part Two: From Description to Inference
  • Chapter 5: Introduction to Inferential Statistics: Sampling and the Sampling Distribution
  • Chapter 6: Estimation Procedures for Sample Means and Proportions
  • Part Three: Bivariate Relationships: Tests of Significance and Measures of Association
  • Chapter 7: Hypothesis Testing with Nominal and Ordinal Variables: Chi Square
  • Chapter 8: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Nominal Level
  • Chapter 9: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Ordinal Level
  • Chapter 10: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The One-Sample Case
  • Chapter 11: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The Two-Sample Case
  • Chapter 12: Hypothesis Testing with More Than Two Means: One-Way Analysis of Variance
  • Chapter 13: Hypothesis Testing and Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Interval-Ratio Level
  • Part Four: Multivariate Techniques
  • Chapter 14: Partial Correlation and Multiple Regression and Correlation
  • Appendix A: Area Under the Normal Curve
  • Appendix B: Distribution of t
  • Appendix C: Distribution of Chi Square
  • Appendix D: Distribution of F
  • Appendix E: Using Statistics: Ideas for Research Projects
  • Appendix F: An Introduction to IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows
  • Appendix G: Information and Code Books for the 2012 Canadian
  • Community Health Survey and 2013 General Social Survey
  • Answers to Odd-Numbered Computational Problems
  • Glossary
  • Index
Statistics: A Tool for Social Research, Fourth Canadian Edition, helps to construct and develop the skills necessary for social science majors to become statistically literate?computational competence, appreciation of statistics, and the ability to read professional social science literature?from a uniquely Canadian perspective. To do so, the text provides a comprehensive, yet exceptionally accessible and reader-friendly discussion of statistics that is appropriate for students with varying levels of mathematical skill, ranging from those who battle statistical ?anxiety? to those adept at math. The text provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of statistics in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step process, and equally stresses hand-based calculation and interpretation of statistics. Students learn to use and interpret statistics in a variety of settings, with most examples, demonstrations, and applications of statistics intended for a diversity of Canadian social issues and social science disciplines, including sociology, political science, social work, public administration, criminology and criminal justice, and gerontology. By providing a solid grounding in both traditional formulas and the use of the latest SPSS statistical software package, Healey and Prus help students to master key statistical concepts and hone the skills they will need to succeed as professionals in a social science field--or simply to become "statistically literate," intelligent consumers of social research.
  • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
  • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
  • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
  • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
  • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
  • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
  • Preface
  • Prologue: Basic Mathematics Review
  • Chapter 1: Introduction
  • Part One: Descriptive Statistics
  • Chapter 2: Basic Descriptive Statistics: Percentages, Ratios and Rates, Tables, Charts, and Graphs
  • Chapter 3: Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion
  • Chapter 4: The Normal Curve
  • Part Two: From Description to Inference
  • Chapter 5: Introduction to Inferential Statistics: Sampling and the Sampling Distribution
  • Chapter 6: Estimation Procedures for Sample Means and Proportions
  • Part Three: Bivariate Relationships: Tests of Significance and Measures of Association
  • Chapter 7: Hypothesis Testing with Nominal and Ordinal Variables: Chi Square
  • Chapter 8: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Nominal Level
  • Chapter 9: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Ordinal Level
  • Chapter 10: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The One-Sample Case
  • Chapter 11: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The Two-Sample Case
  • Chapter 12: Hypothesis Testing with More Than Two Means: One-Way Analysis of Variance
  • Chapter 13: Hypothesis Testing and Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Interval-Ratio Level
  • Part Four: Multivariate Techniques
  • Chapter 14: Partial Correlation and Multiple Regression and Correlation
  • Appendix A: Area Under the Normal Curve
  • Appendix B: Distribution of t
  • Appendix C: Distribution of Chi Square
  • Appendix D: Distribution of F
  • Appendix E: Using Statistics: Ideas for Research Projects
  • Appendix F: An Introduction to IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows
  • Appendix G: Information and Code Books for the 2012 Canadian
  • Community Health Survey and 2013 General Social Survey
  • Answers to Odd-Numbered Computational Problems
  • Glossary
  • Index
Statistics: A Tool for Social Research, Fourth Canadian Edition, helps to construct and develop the skills necessary for social science majors to become statistically literate?computational competence, appreciation of statistics, and the ability to read professional social science literature?from a uniquely Canadian perspective. To do so, the text provides a comprehensive, yet exceptionally accessible and reader-friendly discussion of statistics that is appropriate for students with varying levels of mathematical skill, ranging from those who battle statistical ?anxiety? to those adept at math. The text provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of statistics in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step process, and equally stresses hand-based calculation and interpretation of statistics. Students learn to use and interpret statistics in a variety of settings, with most examples, demonstrations, and applications of statistics intended for a diversity of Canadian social issues and social science disciplines, including sociology, political science, social work, public administration, criminology and criminal justice, and gerontology. By providing a solid grounding in both traditional formulas and the use of the latest SPSS statistical software package, Healey and Prus help students to master key statistical concepts and hone the skills they will need to succeed as professionals in a social science field--or simply to become "statistically literate," intelligent consumers of social research.
  • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
  • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
  • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
  • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
  • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
  • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
  • Preface
  • Prologue: Basic Mathematics Review
  • Chapter 1: Introduction
  • Part One: Descriptive Statistics
  • Chapter 2: Basic Descriptive Statistics: Percentages, Ratios and Rates, Tables, Charts, and Graphs
  • Chapter 3: Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion
  • Chapter 4: The Normal Curve
  • Part Two: From Description to Inference
  • Chapter 5: Introduction to Inferential Statistics: Sampling and the Sampling Distribution
  • Chapter 6: Estimation Procedures for Sample Means and Proportions
  • Part Three: Bivariate Relationships: Tests of Significance and Measures of Association
  • Chapter 7: Hypothesis Testing with Nominal and Ordinal Variables: Chi Square
  • Chapter 8: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Nominal Level
  • Chapter 9: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Ordinal Level
  • Chapter 10: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The One-Sample Case
  • Chapter 11: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The Two-Sample Case
  • Chapter 12: Hypothesis Testing with More Than Two Means: One-Way Analysis of Variance
  • Chapter 13: Hypothesis Testing and Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Interval-Ratio Level
  • Part Four: Multivariate Techniques
  • Chapter 14: Partial Correlation and Multiple Regression and Correlation
  • Appendix A: Area Under the Normal Curve
  • Appendix B: Distribution of t
  • Appendix C: Distribution of Chi Square
  • Appendix D: Distribution of F
  • Appendix E: Using Statistics: Ideas for Research Projects
  • Appendix F: An Introduction to IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows
  • Appendix G: Information and Code Books for the 2012 Canadian
  • Community Health Survey and 2013 General Social Survey
  • Answers to Odd-Numbered Computational Problems
  • Glossary
  • Index
  • Product Description
  • Statistics: A Tool for Social Research, Fourth Canadian Edition, helps to construct and develop the skills necessary for social science majors to become statistically literate?computational competence, appreciation of statistics, and the ability to read professional social science literature?from a uniquely Canadian perspective. To do so, the text provides a comprehensive, yet exceptionally accessible and reader-friendly discussion of statistics that is appropriate for students with varying levels of mathematical skill, ranging from those who battle statistical ?anxiety? to those adept at math. The text provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of statistics in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step process, and equally stresses hand-based calculation and interpretation of statistics. Students learn to use and interpret statistics in a variety of settings, with most examples, demonstrations, and applications of statistics intended for a diversity of Canadian social issues and social science disciplines, including sociology, political science, social work, public administration, criminology and criminal justice, and gerontology. By providing a solid grounding in both traditional formulas and the use of the latest SPSS statistical software package, Healey and Prus help students to master key statistical concepts and hone the skills they will need to succeed as professionals in a social science field--or simply to become "statistically literate," intelligent consumers of social research.
    • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
    • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
    • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
    • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
    • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
    • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
    • Preface
    • Prologue: Basic Mathematics Review
    • Chapter 1: Introduction
    • Part One: Descriptive Statistics
    • Chapter 2: Basic Descriptive Statistics: Percentages, Ratios and Rates, Tables, Charts, and Graphs
    • Chapter 3: Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion
    • Chapter 4: The Normal Curve
    • Part Two: From Description to Inference
    • Chapter 5: Introduction to Inferential Statistics: Sampling and the Sampling Distribution
    • Chapter 6: Estimation Procedures for Sample Means and Proportions
    • Part Three: Bivariate Relationships: Tests of Significance and Measures of Association
    • Chapter 7: Hypothesis Testing with Nominal and Ordinal Variables: Chi Square
    • Chapter 8: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Nominal Level
    • Chapter 9: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Ordinal Level
    • Chapter 10: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The One-Sample Case
    • Chapter 11: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The Two-Sample Case
    • Chapter 12: Hypothesis Testing with More Than Two Means: One-Way Analysis of Variance
    • Chapter 13: Hypothesis Testing and Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Interval-Ratio Level
    • Part Four: Multivariate Techniques
    • Chapter 14: Partial Correlation and Multiple Regression and Correlation
    • Appendix A: Area Under the Normal Curve
    • Appendix B: Distribution of t
    • Appendix C: Distribution of Chi Square
    • Appendix D: Distribution of F
    • Appendix E: Using Statistics: Ideas for Research Projects
    • Appendix F: An Introduction to IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows
    • Appendix G: Information and Code Books for the 2012 Canadian
    • Community Health Survey and 2013 General Social Survey
    • Answers to Odd-Numbered Computational Problems
    • Glossary
    • Index
  • Features
  • Statistics: A Tool for Social Research, Fourth Canadian Edition, helps to construct and develop the skills necessary for social science majors to become statistically literate?computational competence, appreciation of statistics, and the ability to read professional social science literature?from a uniquely Canadian perspective. To do so, the text provides a comprehensive, yet exceptionally accessible and reader-friendly discussion of statistics that is appropriate for students with varying levels of mathematical skill, ranging from those who battle statistical ?anxiety? to those adept at math. The text provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of statistics in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step process, and equally stresses hand-based calculation and interpretation of statistics. Students learn to use and interpret statistics in a variety of settings, with most examples, demonstrations, and applications of statistics intended for a diversity of Canadian social issues and social science disciplines, including sociology, political science, social work, public administration, criminology and criminal justice, and gerontology. By providing a solid grounding in both traditional formulas and the use of the latest SPSS statistical software package, Healey and Prus help students to master key statistical concepts and hone the skills they will need to succeed as professionals in a social science field--or simply to become "statistically literate," intelligent consumers of social research.
    • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
    • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
    • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
    • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
    • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
    • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
    • Preface
    • Prologue: Basic Mathematics Review
    • Chapter 1: Introduction
    • Part One: Descriptive Statistics
    • Chapter 2: Basic Descriptive Statistics: Percentages, Ratios and Rates, Tables, Charts, and Graphs
    • Chapter 3: Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion
    • Chapter 4: The Normal Curve
    • Part Two: From Description to Inference
    • Chapter 5: Introduction to Inferential Statistics: Sampling and the Sampling Distribution
    • Chapter 6: Estimation Procedures for Sample Means and Proportions
    • Part Three: Bivariate Relationships: Tests of Significance and Measures of Association
    • Chapter 7: Hypothesis Testing with Nominal and Ordinal Variables: Chi Square
    • Chapter 8: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Nominal Level
    • Chapter 9: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Ordinal Level
    • Chapter 10: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The One-Sample Case
    • Chapter 11: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The Two-Sample Case
    • Chapter 12: Hypothesis Testing with More Than Two Means: One-Way Analysis of Variance
    • Chapter 13: Hypothesis Testing and Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Interval-Ratio Level
    • Part Four: Multivariate Techniques
    • Chapter 14: Partial Correlation and Multiple Regression and Correlation
    • Appendix A: Area Under the Normal Curve
    • Appendix B: Distribution of t
    • Appendix C: Distribution of Chi Square
    • Appendix D: Distribution of F
    • Appendix E: Using Statistics: Ideas for Research Projects
    • Appendix F: An Introduction to IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows
    • Appendix G: Information and Code Books for the 2012 Canadian
    • Community Health Survey and 2013 General Social Survey
    • Answers to Odd-Numbered Computational Problems
    • Glossary
    • Index
  • About the Author
  • Statistics: A Tool for Social Research, Fourth Canadian Edition, helps to construct and develop the skills necessary for social science majors to become statistically literate?computational competence, appreciation of statistics, and the ability to read professional social science literature?from a uniquely Canadian perspective. To do so, the text provides a comprehensive, yet exceptionally accessible and reader-friendly discussion of statistics that is appropriate for students with varying levels of mathematical skill, ranging from those who battle statistical ?anxiety? to those adept at math. The text provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of statistics in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step process, and equally stresses hand-based calculation and interpretation of statistics. Students learn to use and interpret statistics in a variety of settings, with most examples, demonstrations, and applications of statistics intended for a diversity of Canadian social issues and social science disciplines, including sociology, political science, social work, public administration, criminology and criminal justice, and gerontology. By providing a solid grounding in both traditional formulas and the use of the latest SPSS statistical software package, Healey and Prus help students to master key statistical concepts and hone the skills they will need to succeed as professionals in a social science field--or simply to become "statistically literate," intelligent consumers of social research.
    • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
    • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
    • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
    • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
    • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
    • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
    • Preface
    • Prologue: Basic Mathematics Review
    • Chapter 1: Introduction
    • Part One: Descriptive Statistics
    • Chapter 2: Basic Descriptive Statistics: Percentages, Ratios and Rates, Tables, Charts, and Graphs
    • Chapter 3: Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion
    • Chapter 4: The Normal Curve
    • Part Two: From Description to Inference
    • Chapter 5: Introduction to Inferential Statistics: Sampling and the Sampling Distribution
    • Chapter 6: Estimation Procedures for Sample Means and Proportions
    • Part Three: Bivariate Relationships: Tests of Significance and Measures of Association
    • Chapter 7: Hypothesis Testing with Nominal and Ordinal Variables: Chi Square
    • Chapter 8: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Nominal Level
    • Chapter 9: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Ordinal Level
    • Chapter 10: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The One-Sample Case
    • Chapter 11: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The Two-Sample Case
    • Chapter 12: Hypothesis Testing with More Than Two Means: One-Way Analysis of Variance
    • Chapter 13: Hypothesis Testing and Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Interval-Ratio Level
    • Part Four: Multivariate Techniques
    • Chapter 14: Partial Correlation and Multiple Regression and Correlation
    • Appendix A: Area Under the Normal Curve
    • Appendix B: Distribution of t
    • Appendix C: Distribution of Chi Square
    • Appendix D: Distribution of F
    • Appendix E: Using Statistics: Ideas for Research Projects
    • Appendix F: An Introduction to IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows
    • Appendix G: Information and Code Books for the 2012 Canadian
    • Community Health Survey and 2013 General Social Survey
    • Answers to Odd-Numbered Computational Problems
    • Glossary
    • Index
  • Table of Contents
  • Statistics: A Tool for Social Research, Fourth Canadian Edition, helps to construct and develop the skills necessary for social science majors to become statistically literate?computational competence, appreciation of statistics, and the ability to read professional social science literature?from a uniquely Canadian perspective. To do so, the text provides a comprehensive, yet exceptionally accessible and reader-friendly discussion of statistics that is appropriate for students with varying levels of mathematical skill, ranging from those who battle statistical ?anxiety? to those adept at math. The text provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of statistics in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step process, and equally stresses hand-based calculation and interpretation of statistics. Students learn to use and interpret statistics in a variety of settings, with most examples, demonstrations, and applications of statistics intended for a diversity of Canadian social issues and social science disciplines, including sociology, political science, social work, public administration, criminology and criminal justice, and gerontology. By providing a solid grounding in both traditional formulas and the use of the latest SPSS statistical software package, Healey and Prus help students to master key statistical concepts and hone the skills they will need to succeed as professionals in a social science field--or simply to become "statistically literate," intelligent consumers of social research.
    • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
    • Students are exposed to statistics from a uniquely Canadian perspective to help underline the relevance and importance of statistics to understanding Canadian society. For example, computation and interpretation of statistics occur within a Canadian context; statistics are applied to contemporary social issues in Canada; and end-of-chapter work problems and SPSS exercises have been made relevant to Canadian society.
    • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
    • The revised organization of the textbook chapters makes it possible to examine bivariate relationships within the framework of the included variables’ level of measurement. This change increases internal consistency with the second-edition level-of-measurement-based reorganization. It also makes it more readily possible to address both significance tests and measures of association consecutively on a level-of-measurement by level-of-measurement basis.
    • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
    • Chapter 10 has been fully revised to reflect the textbook’s new order, which now presents several key concepts and techniques according to variable level of measurement. Most notably, the Student’s t distribution, introduction to hypothesis testing, and Type I and Type II errors are now introduced in Chapters 6 and 7. This revision not only adds greater coherence with the level of measurement-based order used in the presentation of descriptive statistics, but it also allows students the opportunity to encounter the challenging logic and techniques of hypothesis testing – now as a familiar tool – in an additional context.
    • Preface
    • Prologue: Basic Mathematics Review
    • Chapter 1: Introduction
    • Part One: Descriptive Statistics
    • Chapter 2: Basic Descriptive Statistics: Percentages, Ratios and Rates, Tables, Charts, and Graphs
    • Chapter 3: Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion
    • Chapter 4: The Normal Curve
    • Part Two: From Description to Inference
    • Chapter 5: Introduction to Inferential Statistics: Sampling and the Sampling Distribution
    • Chapter 6: Estimation Procedures for Sample Means and Proportions
    • Part Three: Bivariate Relationships: Tests of Significance and Measures of Association
    • Chapter 7: Hypothesis Testing with Nominal and Ordinal Variables: Chi Square
    • Chapter 8: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Nominal Level
    • Chapter 9: Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Ordinal Level
    • Chapter 10: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The One-Sample Case
    • Chapter 11: Hypothesis Testing with Means and Proportions: The Two-Sample Case
    • Chapter 12: Hypothesis Testing with More Than Two Means: One-Way Analysis of Variance
    • Chapter 13: Hypothesis Testing and Measures of Association for Variables Measured at the Interval-Ratio Level
    • Part Four: Multivariate Techniques
    • Chapter 14: Partial Correlation and Multiple Regression and Correlation
    • Appendix A: Area Under the Normal Curve
    • Appendix B: Distribution of t
    • Appendix C: Distribution of Chi Square
    • Appendix D: Distribution of F
    • Appendix E: Using Statistics: Ideas for Research Projects
    • Appendix F: An Introduction to IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows
    • Appendix G: Information and Code Books for the 2012 Canadian
    • Community Health Survey and 2013 General Social Survey
    • Answers to Odd-Numbered Computational Problems
    • Glossary
    • Index
 
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